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4 Things to Know Before Bringing Home a Senior Dog

senior dog
  • 19 June 2017
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  • Pet Wants

When individuals or families first start thinking about getting a dog, it’s common for their minds to go to puppies. While a puppy may ultimately be the right choice, plenty of people end up choosing an adult or senior dog. From not worrying about potty-training to already having mastered common commands, there are a lot of compelling reasons to adopt an older dog. If you’ve decided that this kind of companion is perfect for your household, we want to share a handful of tips to help make the process of bringing your new pet home as seamless as possible:

1. Stairs and Floors

Regardless of their size, dealing with stairs or slippery floors can be a challenge for senior dogs. Since you may need to spend some time with your new dog before you know what it can handle and what’s going to be too much, a good option is to use something like a baby gate to initially block your stairs. A rug can be a great way to transform slippery floors into something that an older dog can handle with ease. A folding exercise pen may also be the ideal way to control where your dog initially goes while still giving it plenty of space to feel comfortable in your house.

2. Yard

Once you’ve taken care of the inside of your house, the you’ll want to shift your attention to your yard. It’s important to fill in any holes or other rough terrain where your new dog can injure itself. The same is true for removing any poisonous plants or other potentially problematic elements of your yard. It’s also important to make sure there aren’t any gaps in your fence. And since the decreased vision and hearing that many senior dogs have could make it even harder for them to get home, microchipping is a wise idea if the dog you’re bringing home doesn’t already have this technology.

3. Sleeping

It’s common for older dogs to struggle with arthritic pain. Even if a dog doesn’t signal this pain to you, having an orthopedic dog bed is a great way to make your dog truly comfortable. And as your dog gets more used to your home, putting different sizes of ramps around can help with getting around.

4. Food

The last thing you’ll want to prep for your new dog is its food. Just as senior dogs have their own set of mobility needs, they also have unique requirements in regards to nutrition. That’s why we offer a special senior dog food blend that meets all their needs.

Whether you adopt a senior dog, or your dog grows into senior status, by prepping your stairs, floors and yard, as well as getting an orthopedic bed and the right blend of food, you can be confident that your senior dog will be comfortable and happy.